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OccidentalismLiterary Representations of the Maghrebi Experience of the East-West Encounter$
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Zahia Smail Salhi

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780748645800

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748645800.001.0001

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The Maghreb and the Occident: Towards the Construction of an Occidentalist Discourse

The Maghreb and the Occident: Towards the Construction of an Occidentalist Discourse

Chapter:
(p.10) 1 The Maghreb and the Occident: Towards the Construction of an Occidentalist Discourse
Source:
Occidentalism
Author(s):

Zahia Smail Salhi

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748645800.003.0002

This chapter attempts to construct a non-biased definition of Occidentalism and argues that the term is still an evolving concept being constantly nourished by the ongoing relationship between Orient and Occident. It rejects the view that Occidentalism is the exact reverse of Orientalism and contends that there are many Occidentalisms as expressions by diverse ‘Orientals’ about their equally diverse encounters with the Occident. Occidentalism is therefore, the multi-conceptions produced by multi-nations not only as a reaction against Orientalism, but also as the position of at least four continents out of six, vis-à-vis Western civilisation and as Westernisation. The chapter brings into discussion scholarly views from both Orient and Occident on the issue of Occidentalism and concludes that the differing facets and meanings of Occidentalism in different theoretical perspectives and settings should be interpreted as a sign that testifies to the power of the concept rather than its inadequacy.

Keywords:   Occidentalism, Orientalism, Self-Orientalism, Post-colonialism, Occidentophobia, Occidentophilia

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