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Leonard and Virginia Woolf, The Hogarth Press and the Networks of Modernism$
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Helen Southworth

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780748642274

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748642274.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 31 May 2020

‘Going Over’: The Woolfs, the Hogarth Press and Working-Class Voices

‘Going Over’: The Woolfs, the Hogarth Press and Working-Class Voices

Chapter:
(p.206) Chapter 8 ‘Going Over’: The Woolfs, the Hogarth Press and Working-Class Voices
Source:
Leonard and Virginia Woolf, The Hogarth Press and the Networks of Modernism
Author(s):

Helen Southworth

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748642274.003.0009

This chapter studies the Woolfs' engagement with working-class topics and working-class writers in both society and politics, and the fiction categories. It shows a developing Hogarth Press network during the 1930s and maps a complicated set of negotiations on the poetry and fiction side between writers. Some of these writers are John Hampson, a Birmingham Group novelist, and Huw Menai, a Welsh poet, both of whom wanted to downplay their roots in the working class. The chapter also considers the publishers who saw profit in promoting these writers.

Keywords:   working class, society and politics, fiction categories, negotiations, poetry, John Hampson, Huw Menai, publishers

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