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Prisons in the Late Ottoman EmpireMicrocosms of Modernity$
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Kent F. Schull

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748641734

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641734.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 07 April 2020

Disciplining The Disciplinarians: Combating Corruption And Abuse Through The Professionalisation Of The Prison Cadre

Disciplining The Disciplinarians: Combating Corruption And Abuse Through The Professionalisation Of The Prison Cadre

Chapter:
(p.142) 5 Disciplining The Disciplinarians: Combating Corruption And Abuse Through The Professionalisation Of The Prison Cadre
Source:
Prisons in the Late Ottoman Empire
Author(s):

Kent F. Schull

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641734.003.0006

Chapter Five investigates the Ottoman Prison Administration’s attempts to professionalize its prison cadre in order to combat corruption and prisoner abuse. Ottoman administrators viewed the prison cadre as linchpins of successful prison reform and prisoner rehabilitation. In their minds, the ideal prison guard would be a former military or gendarme officer with good moral character, who could read and write, and had a clear knowledge of the penal codes. This chapter looks at these attempts to reform the prison cadre and its effectiveness in light of actual prisoner experiences that reveal a culture of corruption, collusion, and exploitation. These relationships concretely demonstrate the blurred boundaries between guards and criminals, their power relationships, and consequently between state and society.

Keywords:   prison guards, prisoner abuse, corruption, prison official professionalisation, prison Reform, state-society relations, guard-prisoner relations

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