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Circulating Genius: John Middleton Murry, Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence$
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Sydney Janet Kaplan

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780748641482

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641482.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 06 June 2020

‘A Furious Bliss’

‘A Furious Bliss’

Chapter:
(p.72) Chapter 4 ‘A Furious Bliss’
Source:
Circulating Genius: John Middleton Murry, Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence
Author(s):

Sydney Janet Kaplan

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641482.003.0005

The chapter begins with a contrast between Mansfield's and Lawrence's metaphorical use of the words ‘stillness’ and ‘bliss’ and their differing concepts of epiphanic experience and individual freedom. It discusses the impact of Mansfield's tuberculosis on her writing and on her life with Murry. Mansfield's story, ‘Je ne parle pas francais’, written in Bandol, France, where she had travelled in hopes of recovery, is the focus of this chapter. The story is examined in relation to Mansfield's reactions to her separation from Murry and its intertextual connections with Still Life. The chapter also analyses the correspondence between the couple during Mansfield's stay in France, which becomes a collaborative epistolary text, and culminates in Mansfield's descriptions of the bombardment of Paris in March, 1918.

Keywords:   'Je ne parle pas francais', France, Bombardment of Paris, Epistolary text, Mansfield, Murry, Lawrence, Tuberculosis

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