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Circulating Genius: John Middleton Murry, Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence$
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Sydney Janet Kaplan

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780748641482

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641482.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 March 2020

Circulating Murry

Circulating Murry

Chapter:
(p.195) Chapter 10 Circulating Murry
Source:
Circulating Genius: John Middleton Murry, Katherine Mansfield and D. H. Lawrence
Author(s):

Sydney Janet Kaplan

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641482.003.0011

This chapter examines the public reaction to Murry after Lawrence's death. It analyses Lawrence's representations of Murry in several short stories and Huxley's caricature of him in Point Counterpoint. Murry's critical debate with T. S. Eliot over Romanticism and Classicism is discussed, as is Murry's alienation from Bloomsbury. The second part of the chapter concentrates on Murry's representations of himself in his unpublished journals and his autobiography: Between Two Worlds. It considers the emotional difficulties of his childhood, his altering ideological perspectives, his anxieties about class-identification, and his recurrent obsession with Mansfield and Lawrence throughout the rest of his life.

Keywords:   Lawrence, Huxley, Autobiography, Between Two Worlds, Bloomsbury, Eliot, Class, Childhood, Mansfield

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