Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Bollywood in the Age of New MediaThe Geo-televisual Aesthetic$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Anustup Basu

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780748641024

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641024.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

The Music of Intolerable Love: Indian Film Music, Globalization, and the Sound of Partitioned Selves

The Music of Intolerable Love: Indian Film Music, Globalization, and the Sound of Partitioned Selves

Chapter:
(p.156) Chapter 4 The Music of Intolerable Love: Indian Film Music, Globalization, and the Sound of Partitioned Selves
Source:
Bollywood in the Age of New Media
Author(s):

Anustup Basu

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641024.003.0004

This chapter discusses the use of music and song sequences in Hindi cinema, along with globalisation and the sound of partitioned selves. It first frames the terms of engagement by attaching an aesthetic-political question of lyricism to that of Indian nationalism. In discussing the poetry of Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Aamir Mufti has posed an important question in relation to third world modernities: instead of a more conventional format of aligning categories and events into a narrative of constitution, is it possible to understand historicity as a lyrical assemblage of expressions that are obtuse and eliding in their relational meaningfulness? The work of Faiz has regularly featured in dialogues and lyrics in countless films in India and Pakistan. This chapter examines the lyrical as that which can infuse exiling and errant powers of language and contaminate hard artifacts of historical narration. It looks at some exemplary uses of cinematic musicality in the works of Mani Ratnam, including his 1997 Hindi film Dil Se (From the Heart) whose title track sequence is an anticipatory coupling of affects of violence and love.

Keywords:   Hindi cinema, globalisation, music, song sequences, love, India, lyricism, Mani Ratnam, Aamir Mufti, Dil Se

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.