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Blasted LiteratureVictorian Political Fiction and the Shock of Modernism$
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Deaglan O Donghaile

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780748640676

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Exploiting the Apostles of Destruction: Anarchism, Modernism and the Penny Dreadful

Exploiting the Apostles of Destruction: Anarchism, Modernism and the Penny Dreadful

Chapter:
(p.94) Chapter 3 Exploiting the Apostles of Destruction: Anarchism, Modernism and the Penny Dreadful
Source:
Blasted Literature
Author(s):

Deaglán Ó Donghaile

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640676.003.0004

This chapter considers the negative impression Europeans and Americans had of anarchism during the late nineteenth century. It introduces propaganda by the deed, which provided anarchists with linguistic and conceptual metaphors of action and belief. It looks at how Richard Henry Savage compared the shocks of anarchist violence to the chaotic impact of modern industrial capitalism. The remaining half of the chapter focuses on anarchist modernism, anarchism as a literary intervention, the impact of immigration on Britain's collective and political identity, and H. G. Wells' treatment of the theme of anarchism in his novel The Invisible Man.

Keywords:   anarchism, propaganda, Richard Henry Savage, anarchist violence, industrial capitalism, anarchist modernism, literary intervention, immigration, H. G. Wells

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