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Computing and Language VariationInternational Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing Volume 2$
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John Nerbonne and Charlotte Gooskens

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748640300

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640300.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 26 May 2020

Mutual Intelligibility of Standard and Regional Dutch Language Varieties

Mutual Intelligibility of Standard and Regional Dutch Language Varieties

Chapter:
(p.101) Mutual Intelligibility of Standard and Regional Dutch Language Varieties
Source:
Computing and Language Variation
Author(s):

Leen Impe

Dirk Geeraerts

Dirk Speelman

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640300.003.0006

This chapter discusses the results of an experimental study which investigated the mutual intelligibility of various Dutch language varieties by performing a computer-controlled lexical decision task in which ten target varieties are evaluated — the Belgian and Netherlandic Dutch standard language as well as four regional varieties of both countries. The study auditorily presented real as well as pseudo-words in various varieties of Dutch to Netherlandic and Belgian test subjects, who were asked to decide as quickly as possible whether the items were existing Dutch words or not. The experiment's working assumption is that the faster the subjects react, the better the intelligibility of (the language variety of) the word concerned. This chapter briefly describes the mechanisms underlying the intelligibility results and discusses their relevance for this and other studies in the humanities, addressing non-linguistic determinants such as the informants' attitude towards or familiarity with certain language varieties as well as linguistic factors such as phonetic distance.

Keywords:   intelligibility, Dutch, language varieties, Belgian, Netherlandic Dutch, humanities, linguistic factors, phonetic distance

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