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Derrida and Hospitality Theory and Practice$
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Judith Still

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780748640270

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640270.001.0001

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Patriarchs and their women, some inaugural intertexts of hospitality: the Odyssey, Abraham, Lot and the Levite of Ephraim

Patriarchs and their women, some inaugural intertexts of hospitality: the Odyssey, Abraham, Lot and the Levite of Ephraim

Chapter:
(p.51) 2 Patriarchs and their women, some inaugural intertexts of hospitality: the Odyssey, Abraham, Lot and the Levite of Ephraim
Source:
Derrida and Hospitality Theory and Practice
Author(s):

Judith Still

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640270.003.0002

This chapter analyzes some very particular key texts relating to hospitality which seem to haunt the present, or which act as nodal points crossed by the tensions that still beset us today — episodes from the Odyssey and from the Books of Genesis and Judges in the Old Testament. It goes on to discuss briefly the nostalgic relationship of discourses about hospitality in general to the (text of the) past (a form or structure), which means that the past anxiously inhabits the present text. This past can equally be figured as an ‘elsewhere’, which can be found for instance in praise for (nomadic) Arab hospitality. Finally, it argues that intertextuality can be understood in terms of textual hospitality, and thus also inhospitality, just as much as discourses about hospitality self-consciously refer to a legacy.

Keywords:   Odyssey, Genesis, Judges, Old Testament, intertextuality, textual hospitality, inhospitality

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