Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Ethical Subjects in Contemporary Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dave Boothroyd

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780748640096

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640096.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

. Secrecy and the Secret of Ethical Subjectivity

. Secrecy and the Secret of Ethical Subjectivity

Chapter:
(p.106) 6. Secrecy and the Secret of Ethical Subjectivity
Source:
Ethical Subjects in Contemporary Culture
Author(s):

Dave Boothroyd

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748640096.003.0006

This chapter critically discusses how the formation of ethical subjectivity today must be considered in conjunction with the technopolitics of secrecy and disclosure, and it proposes an account of the ways in which the technical transition and ‘democratisation’ of archival upload/download capacity associated with digital communications fundamentally challenges the existing structures of control over such things as censorship and cultural memory (a theme developed and contextualised further in the following chapter.) Levinas argues that ‘infinite responsibility’ is ‘incarnated’ as the ‘ultimate secret of subjectivity’. In view of Derrida's account of both the necessary technicity of the human and the impossibility of ‘saying the event’, this chapter proposes way of thinking the ethico-technopolitics of secrecy and disclosure in the age of ‘big data’ in terms of the singularity of the event and the unique responsibility of the ethical Subject in relation to that.

Keywords:   Secrecy, Wikileaks, big data, social media, event, technics, meta-data

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.