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Wittgenstein and Political TheoryThe View from Somewhere$
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Christopher C. Robinson

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748639144

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748639144.001.0001

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Aspect-Blindness in Religion, Philosophy, and Law: The Force of Wittgensteinian Reading

Aspect-Blindness in Religion, Philosophy, and Law: The Force of Wittgensteinian Reading

Chapter:
(p.115) Chapter 5 Aspect-Blindness in Religion, Philosophy, and Law: The Force of Wittgensteinian Reading
Source:
Wittgenstein and Political Theory
Author(s):

Christopher C Robinson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748639144.003.0006

Aspect-blindness is a condition that Wittgenstein posits in order to create a contrast to the experience of changes in aspect. This chapter examines the relationship between language-games and aspect-blindness. Can some language-games be so rigid they curtail linguistic creativity extensively enough to induce aspect/meaning blindness, and vice versa? Does the experience of aspect-blindness give an intimate view of the effect of ideology on perception? This chapter defines ideology in Marxian terms as a super-structural or cultural effect that masks reality and directs vision away from the social sources of pain and leaves the sufferer, a person or a class, with no recourse other than seeking relief in religion or stoicism. This chapter also examines Plato's early dialogue, ‘Euthyphro’, and Antonin Scalia's opinion in the case of Michael H. v. Gerald D.

Keywords:   aspect-blindness, Wittgenstein, language-games, linguistic creativity, perception, Euthyphro, Antonin Scalia

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