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Liberal Peace TransitionsBetween Statebuilding and Peacebuilding$
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Oliver P. Richmond and Jason Franks

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748638765

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748638765.001.0001

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Conclusion: Evaluating the Achievements of the Liberal Peace and Revitalising a Virtual Peace

Conclusion: Evaluating the Achievements of the Liberal Peace and Revitalising a Virtual Peace

Chapter:
(p.181) Conclusion: Evaluating the Achievements of the Liberal Peace and Revitalising a Virtual Peace
Source:
Liberal Peace Transitions
Author(s):

Oliver P. Richmond

Jason Franks

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748638765.003.0050

This chapter sums the findings and arguments from the case-study chapters and charts the development and achievements of liberal peace theory as a method for creating a self-sustaining peace in post-conflict states. It re-examines the liberal peace framework, identifies its strengths and weaknesses, and offers some thoughts on some possible responses to the problems. It suggests the need for modifications or alternative approaches for making peace, perhaps through greater cultural sensitivity and local ownership and with a focus on the agency, rights, needs, and welfare of the communities and individuals concerned rather than on overly securitised institutions and states. The liberal peace has shown in its statebuilding forms to have very limited capacity where the three levels of legitimacy become diluted by a wide range of problems.

Keywords:   liberal peace theory, self-sustaining peace, post-conflict states, cultural sensitivity, statebuilding

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