Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
John Keats and the Ideas of the Enlightenment$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Porscha Fermanis

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748637805

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748637805.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

Moral Philosophy: Sympathetic Identification, Utility and the Natural History of Religion in The Fall of Hyperion

Moral Philosophy: Sympathetic Identification, Utility and the Natural History of Religion in The Fall of Hyperion

Chapter:
(p.121) Chapter 5 Moral Philosophy: Sympathetic Identification, Utility and the Natural History of Religion in The Fall of Hyperion
Source:
John Keats and the Ideas of the Enlightenment
Author(s):

Porscha Fermanis

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748637805.003.0006

This chapter investigates the relationship between John Keats' representation of the poet-figure and theories of moral philosophy in The Fall of Hyperion. It begins by addressing the extent to which Enlightenment theories of moral philosophy inform Keats' own ideas about human understanding and moral judgement. It then explores the sociological frameworks that formally structure The Fall. It also considers the relationship between beauty and utility in Shelley's Defence of Poetry and Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments. The Fall moves beyond the rhetoric of tragic suffering in the sense implied by the term ‘sentimental history’ so that sorrow and suffering become not only the dominant tropes of the poem, but also its central themes. It ultimately proclaims the adequacy of visionary experience and the poetic imagination as a vehicle of social reform by refuting the argument that poetry is divorced from truth and reality.

Keywords:   John Keats, The Fall of Hyperion, Shelley, Defence of Poetry, Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments, Enlightenment, moral philosophy, social reform

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.