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Exploring Environmental HistorySelected Essays$
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T. C. Smout

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780748635139

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748635139.001.0001

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The Pinewoods and Human Use, 1600–1900*

The Pinewoods and Human Use, 1600–1900*

Chapter:
(p.71) CHAPTER 4 The Pinewoods and Human Use, 1600–1900*
Source:
Exploring Environmental History
Author(s):

T. C. Smout

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748635139.003.0004

Native Scottish pinewoods have, in many cases, been deer forests, reserved for elite hunters, and they have all been wood pastures, used by the farmers' cattle, sheep, horses and goats. They have been a timber and fuel resource for local people, and the subject of exploitation by the external market. Only since the twentieth century have they been widely admired and visited by outsiders for their beauty, biodiversity and historic significance, though the roots of this admiration lie with the Victorians. Each one of these uses has left its mark on the woods, along with the underlying effects of climate. Each one has also varied in character and impact with the changing centuries.

Keywords:   environmental history, Scottish pinewoods, Victorians, climate

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