Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Great War on the Small ScreenRepresenting the First World War in Contemporary Britain$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Emma Hanna

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748633890

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748633890.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 27 June 2022

A Monumental Monument: The Great War (BBC, 1964)

A Monumental Monument: The Great War (BBC, 1964)

Chapter:
(p.32) 2 A Monumental Monument: The Great War (BBC, 1964)
Source:
The Great War on the Small Screen
Author(s):

Emma Hanna

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748633890.003.0003

The Great War (BBC, 1964) was Britain's national televisual war memorial. It a landmark 26-part historical documentary about Britain in the First World War which bequeathed to British television an enduring historical, technical and historiographical legacy. The Great War was deemed to herald a new age in television programme making. The series was first broadcast in May 1964, on the fledgling BBC2 channel, and every episode averaged over 8 million viewers. However, despite the writing talents of historians such as John Terraine and Corelli Barnett, the involvement of the Imperail War Museum, its impressive scale and popularity with viewers, The Great War did not change the way the majority of the nation thought and felt about 1914-18. The overwhelming visual and emotional impact of the programme cemented its own variations on the canon of war myths already embedded in Britain's cultural landscape by 1964. Any programme which has subsequently attempted to present a new television history of the war has been unfavourably compared to The Great War as the established grand narrative of Britain 1914-18.

Keywords:   Television production, John Terraine, Corelli Barnett, BBC2, Imperial War Museum

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.