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Academic Patronage in the Scottish EnlightenmentGlasgow, Edinburgh and St Andrews Universities$
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Roger L. Emerson

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780748625963

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748625963.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 08 April 2020

Edinburgh University to 1704

Edinburgh University to 1704

Chapter:
(p.211) 8 Edinburgh University to 1704
Source:
Academic Patronage in the Scottish Enlightenment
Author(s):

Roger L. Emerson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748625963.003.0008

This chapter discusses the largest and most prestigious of the universities — Edinburgh University. It describes the university as the centre of national life and as the most intellectually vibrant place in the country. It observes that the city attracted members of the political elite who enjoyed the social amenities of the city as they attended court and sought suitors for their daughters and jobs for their sons. It notes that the purging of Edinburgh University after the Revolution of 1688–90 was accomplished by the end of 1690, involving the professor of mathematics, David Gregorie of Kinnairdie (24 June 1661–10 October 1708) and the ousted principal, Alexander Monro, who probably had some help from his colleague, the professor of divinity, John Strachan.

Keywords:   Edinburgh University, Revolution, David Gregorie, Alexander Monro, John Strachan

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