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Muslims in BritainRace, Place and Identities$
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Peter Hopkins and Richard Gale

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748625871

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748625871.001.0001

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Race, ‘Face’ and Masculinity: The Identities and Local Geographies of Muslim Boys

Race, ‘Face’ and Masculinity: The Identities and Local Geographies of Muslim Boys

Chapter:
(p.74) Chapter 5 Race, ‘Face’ and Masculinity: The Identities and Local Geographies of Muslim Boys
Source:
Muslims in Britain
Author(s):

Peter Hopkins

Richard Gale

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748625871.003.0005

This chapter discusses the experiences of Muslim boys by focusing upon issues such as masculinity, neighbourhood spaces, schooling and territoriality in the lives of Muslim youth. The significance of space/place to the boys' experiences and identity constructions is considered. This account underscores the difficulties inherent in attempts to challenge racisms within society. Public concerns about the rise of radicalism among young British Muslims are reported here. Muslims are increasingly subject to a forced telling of the self in UK public life. It is also shown that while there are considerable differences between the contemporary post-9/11, post-7/7 world and the post-Rushdie era of the study, there is a pertinent parallel, in that both are times in which young Muslims, but particularly young Muslim men, are being forced to situate (and explain) themselves in relation to wider, negative (demonising) discourses around ‘fundamentalist’, ‘dangerous’ Muslim masculinity.

Keywords:   masculinity, neighbourhood spaces, schooling, territoriality, Muslim boys, racisms, British Muslims

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