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Archaeology and the Emergence of Greece$
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Anthony Snodgrass

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780748623334

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748623334.001.0001

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The Economics of Dedication at Greek Sanctuaries

The Economics of Dedication at Greek Sanctuaries

Chapter:
(p.258) Chapter 14 The Economics of Dedication at Greek Sanctuaries
Source:
Archaeology and the Emergence of Greece
Author(s):

Anthony Snodgrass

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748623334.003.0014

Whether at Panhellenic sanctuaries — Olympia, Delphi, Delos — or at city and ethnos sanctuaries — Lindos, Perachora, Isthmia, the Argive and Samian Heraea, the Athenian Acropolis, Pherae — there is a very marked preponderance in the number of small dedications of geometric and archaic date, by comparison with those of later times. This profligacy of dedication was not a practice of time-honoured antiquity: in most cases, it had itself only come into being in the course of the eighth century BC. We are thus dealing initially with an episode that is roughly co-terminous with the archaic period of Greece. We must immediately concede that it is a phenomenon which relates entirely to preserved dedications. Parallel patterns of dedication, with a climax in the seventh and sixth centuries BC and a decline thereafter, can be observed in other categories of dedication, such as metal armour and weapons. At Olympia, for example, we have also a rich series of helmets which have been well studied.

Keywords:   Greece, dedications, sanctuaries, Olympia, helmets, metal armour, weapons, Delphi, Delos, Isthmia

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