Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Propaganda, Censorship and Irish Neutrality in the Second World War$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Robert Cole

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780748622771

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748622771.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

From ‘Operation Barbarossa’ to Pearl Harbor: June–December 1941

From ‘Operation Barbarossa’ to Pearl Harbor: June–December 1941

Chapter:
(p.85) 5 From ‘Operation Barbarossa’ to Pearl Harbor: June–December 1941
Source:
Propaganda, Censorship and Irish Neutrality in the Second World War
Author(s):

Robert Cole

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748622771.003.0006

With the launch of ‘Operation Barbarossa’, as the Germans termed the invasion of Russia, the war of words over Eire neutrality expanded – and took on a few variations in direction as well. Irish Americans were growing more antagonistic towards America's increasingly pro-British interpretation of neutrality. Pro-Eire Irish-American propaganda did not end with assaults on the American Irish Defense Association. Eire appeared almost amenable to British Catholic propaganda compared to the Irish audience in America, at least as it was represented in the Irish-American press. The censor was much harder on the Eire press, which had a significantly larger circulation. Then came 7 December, and the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The United States was catapulted into the thick of the global conflict, and in 1942 would emerge as an ‘official’ participant alongside Britain in the war of words over Eire neutrality.

Keywords:   Operation Barbarossa, Pearl Harbor, war of words, Eire neutrality, propaganda, United States, Britain

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.