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Citizenship in BritainA History$
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Derek Heater

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780748622252

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748622252.001.0001

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Citizenship as a key concept

Citizenship as a key concept

Chapter:
(p.206) Chapter 7 Citizenship as a key concept
Source:
Citizenship in Britain
Author(s):

Derek Heater

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748622252.003.0008

The creation of the Welfare State, which consolidated social rights as, for all intents and purposes, an indisputable element of British citizenship, was in large measure the achievement of the Labour Party brought to power in 1945. There was some uncertainty about whether the Conservatives would support these reforms, might even dismantle them when they came into office. However, during the war, while deeply fearful of its huge expense, Churchill accepted the principles of the Beveridge Report; and he showed his commitment to post-war planning by creating the Reconstruction Committee. This chapter discusses party doctrines and education; Celtic nationhoods; and the impact of the immigration and settlement of peoples of various ethnic, religious, and cultural backgrounds on British citizenship.

Keywords:   welfare state, British citizenship, social rights, Labour Party, Celtic nationhoods

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