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TextsContemporary Cultural Texts and Critical Approaches$
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Peter Childs

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780748620432

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748620432.001.0001

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Critical Text: Alan Sokal's Sham Transgression

Critical Text: Alan Sokal's Sham Transgression

Approach: Reading Postmodernism

Chapter:
(p.105) Chapter 10 Critical Text: Alan Sokal's Sham Transgression
Source:
Texts
Author(s):

Peter Childs

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748620432.003.0011

In an article published in Lingua Franca entitled ‘A Physicist Experiments with Cultural Studies’, Alan Sokal, a Professor of Physics at New York University, announced that his article, ‘Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity’, printed in a special ‘Science Wars’ edition of the social science journal Social Text, was a hoax. ‘Transgressing the Boundaries’ had claimed that Western science was ideology masquerading as objectivity, that ‘scientific “knowledge”’ encodes a culture’s power relations, and that ‘physical “reality”’ is as much a socio-linguistic construct as is social reality. To prepare the ground for revealing his article as bogus, Sokal had peppered it with what he knew or believed to be preposterous assertions, scientific falsehoods, and logical errors. In ‘A Physicist Experiments’, he therefore exposed his earlier article as, according to his intention, ‘a melange of truths, half-truths, quarter-truths, falsehoods, and syntactically correct sentences that have no meaning whatsoever.’ His aim was to reveal postmodernism, as he understood it, as itself an insidious ideology; one which the non-refereed journal Social Text had accepted so fully that it was willing to publish an article that had no intellectual merit merely because it toed their party line.

Keywords:   Reading Postmodernism, Alan Sokal, Sokal Affair, Social Text

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