Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Julius CaesarThe People's Dictator$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Luciano Canfora

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780748619368

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748619368.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 30 July 2021

The Dynamics of the ‘Tyrannicide’

The Dynamics of the ‘Tyrannicide’

Chapter:
(p.325) Chapter 39 The Dynamics of the ‘Tyrannicide’
Source:
Julius Caesar
Author(s):
Luciano Canfora, Julian Stringer
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748619368.003.0039

The evening before the assassination, Caesar was among the guests at supper at the house of Marcus Lepidus, his magister equitum, and the discussion turned to the question: what kind of death would be best? While the rather strange conversation lingered on this question, Caesar, when his turn came to speak, said that he would by far prefer a sudden and unexpected death. The conversation on the eve of the assassination is somewhat enigmatic. There is nothing unusual, given the situation, about conversations consisting of allusive questions or innuendo, designed to pass a veiled message. Incidents like this make one think of a Caesar hounded by those who want to kill him, and, therefore, also ‘pestered’ by those bent on the opposite, who try, with more or less cryptic warnings, to save him.

Keywords:   Julius Caesar, death, warnings, Marcus Lepidus, assassination, tyrannicide

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.