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Julius CaesarThe People's Dictator$
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Luciano Canfora

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780748619368

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748619368.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 29 March 2020

‘Lure Caesus’

‘Lure Caesus’

Chapter:
(p.269) Chapter 30 ‘Lure Caesus’
Source:
Julius Caesar
Author(s):
Luciano Canfora, Julian Stringer
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748619368.003.0030

The victory over Spain, that is, over Pompey's sons, was the first signal of a change in style that characterised the last months of the life and government of Caesar. In comparison with the few months spent in Rome after his return from Africa (August–October 46 bc), the autumn and winter season of 45–44 bc, between the triumph celebrated in October and the Ides of March, presents a completely different situation: it was characterised by Caesar's determined efforts to place his personal power finally within the framework of a new order, and by mounting reactions to this openly authoritarian development. Examining these last months of Caesar's life, Napoleon observed that, beside the push to dictatorial power, Caesar decided to pay even more attention to the noble classes and to distance himself still further from the growing demands of the common people.

Keywords:   Julius Caesar, Spain, power, Ides of March

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