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Clifford Ando

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780748615650

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748615650.001.0001

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Introduction to Part II: Religious Institutions and Religious Authority

Introduction to Part II: Religious Institutions and Religious Authority

Chapter:
(p.57) Introduction to Part II: Religious Institutions and Religious Authority
Source:
Roman Religion
Author(s):

Clifford Ando

Publisher:
Discontinued
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748615650.003.0021

What we study when we study religion is one mode of constructing worlds of meaning, worlds within which men find themselves and in which they choose to dwell. What we study is the passion and drama of man discovering the truth of what it is to be human. History is the framework within whose perimeter those human expressions, activities and intentionalities that we call “religious” occur. Religion is the quest, within the bounds of the human historical condition, for the power to manipulate and negotiate one’s “situation” so as to have space in which meaningfully to dwell. It is the power to relate one’s domain to the plurality of environmental and social spheres in such a way as to guarantee the conviction that one’s existence “matters.” Religion is a distinctive mode of human creativity, a creativity which both limits and creates limits for human existence. What we study when we study religion is the variety of attempts to map, construct and inhabit such positions of power through the use of myths, rituals and experiences of transformation....

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