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Rome in Late AntiquityEveryday Life and Urban Change, AD 312-609$
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Bertrand Lancon

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780748612390

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748612390.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 31 March 2020

Education and culture

Education and culture

Chapter:
(p.149) Chapter 12 Education and culture
Source:
Rome in Late Antiquity
Author(s):

Menno Fenger

Paul Henman

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748612390.003.0013

Rome was one of the capitals of education and liberal arts endowed with public libraries. The fourth century was the time when the scroll, the volumen, was gradually making way for the codex, a book of bound pages. This new practice, which was the forerunner of books, offered an incomparable ease of reading by comparison with the volumen, which necessitated continual unrolling and re-rolling, with help from another person. Roman education was marked by strong traditionalism. The characteristics of education were classicism and variety. Augustine and Boethius, to an even greater extent, were learned men capable of writing on many subjects. The chapter also shows that the conversion of great rhetors to Christianity had an incalculable effect on Roman society and the advance of the Christian faith.

Keywords:   Rome, education, liberal arts, libraries, volumen, codex, traditionalism, classicism, variety, rhetors

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