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American Cinema in the Shadow of 9/11$
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Terence McSweeney

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474413817

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474413817.001.0001

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Training the Body Politic: Networked Masculinity and the ‘War on Terror’ in Hollywood Film

Training the Body Politic: Networked Masculinity and the ‘War on Terror’ in Hollywood Film

Chapter:
(p.147) Chapter 7 Training the Body Politic: Networked Masculinity and the ‘War on Terror’ in Hollywood Film
Source:
American Cinema in the Shadow of 9/11
Author(s):

Adam Knee

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474413817.003.0008

Adam Knee continues this discussion of the action/adventure genre in Chapter Seven, "Training the Body Politic: Networked Masculinity and the 'War on Terror' in Hollywood Film", offering a detailed analysis of the representation of masculinity and agency in two Hollywood films, Unstoppable (2010) and Source Code (2011), which exhibit striking similarities at a range of levels, from their narratives to deeper structures of gendered character function, theme, and geo-political perspective that, he contends, are a manifestation of distinctly post-9/11 American concerns. Like Vincent M. Gaine's chapter on James Bond, Knee analyses both the variations inherent in the genre in the wake of 9/11 and the consistencies of the parameters of American mainstream film, and, more specifically, a developing conceptualization of modes of disciplined masculinity necessitated by the nation’s 'War on Terror' narrative. Knee then concludes with a comparative analysis of a pre-9/11 film and its post-9/11 remake in which these parameters are brought to the fore: the original Paul Verhoeven RoboCop (1987) and RoboCop (2014) directed by José Padilha.

Keywords:   Hollywood film, War on Terror, action film, trauma

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