Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Reassessing Legal Humanism and its ClaimsPetere Fontes?$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul J. du Plessis and John W. Cairns

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474408851

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474408851.001.0001

Show Summary Details

The Working Methods of Hugo Grotius: Which Sources Did He Use and How Did He Use Them in His Early Writings on Natural Law Theory?

The Working Methods of Hugo Grotius: Which Sources Did He Use and How Did He Use Them in His Early Writings on Natural Law Theory?

Chapter:
(p.154) 7 The Working Methods of Hugo Grotius: Which Sources Did He Use and How Did He Use Them in His Early Writings on Natural Law Theory?
Source:
Reassessing Legal Humanism and its Claims
Author(s):

Martine J van Ittersum

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474408851.003.0008

This essay chapter analyses the working methods of the Dutch jurist Hugo Grotius (1583-1645), particularly his use and referencing of ‘sources’ in his early works on natural law and natural rights. Like most early modern scholars, Grotius garnished his texts with second-hand quotations of authoritative writers (the Classics, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, etc.) and his marginalia with second-hand references to authoritative texts. He often obtained these materials from sixteenth-century florilegia and reference works. A case in point is Grotius’ referencing of Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae in Ms. BPL 917 in Leiden University Library. When we compare underlined passages in Grotius’ own copy of the Summa Theologiae with his references to Aquinas in Ms. BPL 917, we discover that two Catholic theologians --Thomas Cajetan and Francisco de Vitoria-- served as his reader’s guides to the Summa Theologiae, and shaped his understanding of Aquinas in crucial respects.

Keywords:   Hugo Grotius, working methods of early modern scholars, secondhand quotations, secondhand references, Thomas Aquinas, Francisco de Vitoria, Thomas Cajetan

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.