Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
American Independent CinemaRites of Passage and the Crisis Image$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Anna Backman Rogers

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748693603

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748693603.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
American Independent Cinema
Author(s):

Anna Backman Rogers

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748693603.003.0001

American independent cinema is certainly a cinema in crisis, but it is also a cinema of crisis. A great deal of useful scholarship has been carried out on the notion of independence and the definition of indie cinema as a hybrid industry (‘indiewood’). This study partakes of that conversation, but from the perspective of the aesthetics and poetics of crisis that figure or visualise notions of ambiguity and the in-between. The cinema of crisis delineated here is one that explores the difficulty or impossibility of progression through extended moments of liminality and threshold. In a cinema of crisis, the concept of a plot is subservient to the investigation of what it means to exist in a moment of threshold within the context of a rite of passage; this moment may usher in transformation, or it may lead to stasis and not offer any form of resolution. What the viewer sees on screen are bodies that may halt, falter, freeze and become-surface, or evolve, mutate, dissolve and merge: these are bodies in crisis because they are either atrophying or becoming-other.

Keywords:   American Indie Cinema, American Independent Cinema, Art Cinema, Independent film, Indie Film, Sofia Coppola, Jim Jarmusch, Gus Van Sant, Crisis, Rites of Passage

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.