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Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300–1625Essays in Honour of Jenny Wormald$
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Steve Boardman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748691500

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748691500.001.0001

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‘Scotland will be the Ending of all Empires’: Mr Thomas Murray and King James VI and I

‘Scotland will be the Ending of all Empires’: Mr Thomas Murray and King James VI and I

Chapter:
(p.320) Chapter 15 ‘Scotland will be the Ending of all Empires’: Mr Thomas Murray and King James VI and I
Source:
Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300–1625
Author(s):

Jamie Reid-Baxter

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748691500.003.0016

Thomas Murray, a convinced presbyterian who was nonetheless tutor and then secretary to Prince Charles, and died as provost of Eton, has been little explored by historians or literary scholars. This chapter argues that as a Scot at the heart of the royal establishment, and translator into Latin of King James’s Lepanto, Murray deserves greater consideration. The chapter reviews Murray’s surviving poetry (in Latin), only part of which ever saw publication, and in particular, considers the never-before discussed manuscript paraphrase of the Lamentations held in the National Library of Scotland. It is argued that this work dates from 1587-88 and enunciates a militantly protestant rôle for James VI on the world-stage, something which can be paralleled not only in the writings of Andrew Melville and John Malcolm, but indeed those of James VI himself before he restyled himself as rex pacificus.

Keywords:   poetry, education, Reformation, James VI

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