Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Empathy and the Psychology of Literary Modernism
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Empathy and the Psychology of Literary Modernism

Meghan Marie Hammond

Abstract

Empathy is a cognitive and affective structure of feeling, a bridge across interpersonal distance. Coined in 1909 to combine English “sympathy” and German “Einfühlung,” “empathy” is a specifically twentieth-century concept of fellow feeling. Empathy and the Psychology of Literary Modernism looks at the intertwined histories of empathy and modernist narrative in order to advance new portraits of both. Reconsidering the conditions of modernism’s “inward turn,” this book shows how five exemplary writers (Henry James, Dorothy Richardson, Katherine Mansfield, Ford Madox Ford, and Virginia Woolf) ta ... More

Keywords: empathy, modernism, psychology, sympathy, fellow feeling, Henry James, Dorothy Richardson, Katherine Mansfield, Ford Madox Ford, Virginia Woolf

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2014 Print ISBN-13: 9780748690985
Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2015 DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748690985.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Meghan Marie Hammond, author
New York University