Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dundee and the Empire'Juteopolis' 1850-1939$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jim Tomlinson

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748686148

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748686148.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Juteopolis and Imperial Globalisation

Juteopolis and Imperial Globalisation

Chapter:
(p.23) Chapter 2 Juteopolis and Imperial Globalisation
Source:
Dundee and the Empire
Author(s):

Jim Tomlinson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748686148.003.0003

This chapter examines the impact of globalisation and empire upon industrial Britain by focusing on the case of the Scottish city of Dundee as Juteopolis. Economic historians have suggested that falling transport costs combined with reductions in trade barriers triggered a rise in trade volumes in the nineteenth century. These processes have been most intensively studied for trade across the North Atlantic, where the expansion of the grain traded from North America into European markets epitomised much of what was happening. The expansion of trade in the North Atlantic was closely associated with two other key features of contemporary globalisation: the multiplication of international capital flows and migration. Within this fast-expanding multilateral trading system, India became a linchpin in the run-up to World War I by being a major global supplier of raw materials and foodstuffs. Meanwhile, Dundee was at the centre of the process of imperial globalisation, with its jute industry contributing on a large scale to the British outflows of capital and migrants. This chapter considers the competition between Calcutta and Dundee in the area of jute production.

Keywords:   globalisation, empire, industrial Britain, Dundee, Juteopolis, North Atlantic trade, migration, India, jute industry, competition

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.