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Dundee and the Empire'Juteopolis' 1850-1939$
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Jim Tomlinson

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748686148

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748686148.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Dundee and the Empire
Author(s):

Jim Tomlinson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748686148.003.0001

This book explores the relation between empire and popular culture by focusing on the British Empire's material consequences. Using the case of the Scottish city of Dundee, it analyses the interwoven issues of empire and globalisation from the ‘expansionary’ period before 1914 and the era from World War I to World War II. Dundee is especially well-suited for this purpose given both the strength of its imperial connections — especially with India — and the intensity of its globalisation. Dundee's connections with India arose primarily from its role as ‘Juteopolis’: from the 1850s the city's jute industry expanded rapidly, with Bengal as the supplier of raw materials. The book puts Dundee's relationship with empire in the context of national and international developments as well as debates that shaped that relationship. In particular, it examines the ways in which imperial issues became woven into the debates in the city about how to respond to Calcutta's rise as a competitor, along with the response of Dundee's working class to the insecurities brought about by competition.

Keywords:   popular culture, British Empire, Dundee, globalisation, India, Juteopolis, jute industry, raw materials, working class, competition

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