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The Invention of a PeopleHeidegger and Deleuze on Art and the Political$
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Janae Sholtz

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748685356

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748685356.001.0001

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Deleuze on Art and Ontology

Deleuze on Art and Ontology

Chapter:
(p.125) 4 Deleuze on Art and Ontology
Source:
The Invention of a People
Author(s):

Janae Sholtz

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748685356.003.0004

Chapter Four begins with an interstitial reading of Kostos Axelos’ philosophical import for Heidegger and Deleuze, issuing in a discussion of the significance of planetary thinking and the cosmic. Deleuze reprises Axelos’ idea of planetary thinking as cosmic becoming. Though mainly the chapter explicates the aesthetic dimension of Deleuze’s ontology. Utilizing the innovations that Deleuze finds in Nietzsche’s diagnosis of a new kind of being, the simulacrum, an ontology of creative differential forces is presented that is “truer to the earth.” The idea of the work of art as simulacrum is linked to those of the assemblage and the abstract machine. Next, production of affects is connected to events of becoming, yielding that art provides the possibility of new modes, objects and thoughts. The chapter ends by examining how the transformative potential of art initiates a new relation to the earth and produces a different notion of a people-to-come.

Keywords:   Deleuze, assemblage, abstract machine, sentiendum, simulacrum, cosmic, Francis Bacon, Axelos, affect, refrain

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