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Iconoclastic TheologyGilles Deleuze and the Secretion of Atheism$
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F. LeRon Shults

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748684137

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748684137.001.0001

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Breaking Theological Icons

Breaking Theological Icons

Chapter:
(p.25) 2 Breaking Theological Icons
Source:
Iconoclastic Theology
Author(s):

F. LeRon Shults

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748684137.003.0002

This chapter introduces the first and perhaps most obvious sense in which Deleuze’s theology is iconoclastic: it hammers away at the Platonic notion of icons as good copies of ideal models. In fact, his whole philosophical project contributed to the inversion or “reversal of Platonism,” a phrase Deleuze borrows from Nietzsche but develops in his own way. Exploring Deleuze’s passion for overturning Platonism is also a good place to start because it further clarifies the sense in which his iconoclasm is theological, criticizing and constructing hypotheses about the conditions for axiological engagement. This chapter focuses on the resources Deleuze finds in Kant, Spinoza and Nietzsche for overturning religious figures.

Keywords:   Deleuze, Plato, Kant, Spinoza, Nietzsche, Christ

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