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Nancy and the Political$
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Sanja Dejanovic

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748683178

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748683178.001.0001

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The Separated Gesture

The Separated Gesture

Partaking in the Inoperative Praxis of the Already-Unmade1

Chapter:
(p.192) 8 The Separated Gesture
Source:
Nancy and the Political
Author(s):

John Paul Ricco

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748683178.003.0008

Even when seemingly solely devoted to questions of sovereignty and community, or art and assemblage, or decision and justice—or when written without any one or more of these signifying markers of politics, aesthetics, and ethics, few texts by Nancy are devoid of thinking the political, aesthetic, and ethical together. This is because these three spheres, which Nancy himself understands to be separate and non-determinative of each other, are, nonetheless, also understood as coextensive in their mutual heterogeneity. It is this relational tension without resolution between the political, aesthetic and the ethical—of being at once inextricably tied to each other and yet irreducible and incommensurable to each other—that is for Nancy the very spacing of sense as shared-separation, or to appropriate terms central to his thinking: le frayage du partage (the frayed path, passage, edge and opening of sharing-out). The task set for us by the work of Nancy, then, is to think this infinite rapport and never-to-be-finalized relation between the spheres of the political, the aesthetic and the ethical, in terms of what he has referred to as ‘the condition of nonequivalent affirmation’.

Keywords:   Non-equivalence, Aesthetics, Art, Community, Infinite, Justice, Felix Gonzalex-Torres, Marx, Blanchot

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