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Defining Greek Narrative$
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Douglas Cairns and Ruth Scodel

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748680108

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748680108.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Defining Greek Narrative
Author(s):

Ruth Scodel

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748680108.003.0001

Although many studies have applied structuralist narratology to Greek literature, this volume, influenced by ‘new narratologies', seeks to define about Greek narrative practice is universal and what is characteristically Greek, and to locate particular Greek narratives and narrative practices within a specific history. A comparative approach, whether to epic, the epistolary novel, historiography, or special devices like the anonymous traveller, reveals both affinities and sharp differences from both the narratives of other ancient cultures and from modern parallels. The generic requirements of history and tragedy, performance occasions, and the high level of self-consciousness produced by the prestige of Homer, rhetorical practice, and the critical tradition all combined to make Greek narrative traditions, in all their diversity, distinctively Greek.

Keywords:   New narratologies, Epic, Comparative approach, Structuralist narratology, Homer

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