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Shane MeadowsCritical Essays$
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Martin Fradley, Sarah Godfrey, and Melanie Williams

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780748676392

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748676392.001.0001

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‘An object of indecipherable bastardry – a true monster’: Homosociality, Homoeroticism and Generic Hybridity in Dead Man's Shoes

‘An object of indecipherable bastardry – a true monster’: Homosociality, Homoeroticism and Generic Hybridity in Dead Man's Shoes

Chapter:
(p.95) Chapter 7 ‘An object of indecipherable bastardry – a true monster’: Homosociality, Homoeroticism and Generic Hybridity in Dead Man's Shoes
Source:
Shane Meadows
Author(s):

Clair Schwarz

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748676392.003.0007

This chapter explores Shane Meadows's approaches to genre, arguing that hybrid forms of film type are employed in order to underscore the elements of myth which are evident in his work. In particular, it looks at how evocations of the monster weave through the homosocial romances of the male characters and the way in which they exchange women, or their images, as a means to sure up those relationships. Drawing upon Sedgwick's notion of the erotic triangle and its homosocial dynamic, the chapter looks closely at the vengeance narrative of Dead Man's Shoes, arguing how tropes drawn from Jacobean theatre and genres such as the horror and the western, are particularly employed to question existing models of relationships, whether fraternal, paternal or the modern construct of the nuclear family. Through an examination of the different manifestation of violence in Meadows's work, the chapter suggests that rape, assault and murder are acts which make explicit the underlying homoerotophobia of the texts, with the figure of the monster as a liminal bridge between unconscious desire and physical action. It concludes that Meadows eventually abandons his generic conceits, offering instead a deliberate equivocation which dissolves any fixed notions of style.

Keywords:   Shane Meadows, Genre, Hybridity, Homoerotic, Homosocial, Vengeance, Myth, Monster, violence

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