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Shane MeadowsCritical Essays$
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Martin Fradley, Sarah Godfrey, and Melanie Williams

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780748676392

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748676392.001.0001

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‘What do you think makes a bad dad?’ Shane Meadows and Fatherhood

‘What do you think makes a bad dad?’ Shane Meadows and Fatherhood

Chapter:
(p.171) Chapter 12 ‘What do you think makes a bad dad?’ Shane Meadows and Fatherhood
Source:
Shane Meadows
Author(s):

Martin Fradley

, Seán Kingston
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748676392.003.0012

Shane Meadows is best known for his androcentric perspective on the array of social problems facing the erstwhile industrial communities of the Midlands; this essay, however, focuses attention on the female characters that are, for the most part, contained at the margins of his cinematic narratives and pays particular attention to the representation of mothers within his work. Despite their peripheral nature we argue that the female characters in Meadows films fulfil a vital narrative function, serving in the recuperation of disenfranchised masculinity and as such are crucial to understanding both the gender politics of Meadows work and the director's own position within contemporary British film culture. In this chapter we explore the narratological function of a number of Meadows' cinematic female characters and offer a feminist perspective on the questions of class, race, gender and motherhood that his work raises.

Keywords:   Gender, Class, Motherhood, A Room for Romeo Brass, Somers Town, TwentyFourSeven, This is England, Women, Domesticity, Authenticity

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