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Our NazisRepresentations of Fascism in Contemporary Literature and Film$
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Petra Rau

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780748668649

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748668649.001.0001

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Coda

Coda

Chapter:
(p.190) Coda
Source:
Our Nazis
Author(s):

Petra Rau

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748668649.003.0007

This chapter examines the intertextual strategies and visual grammar of Quentin Tarantino’s alternative history film Inglourious Basterds which deals with the role the cinema in a successful plot to assassinate Hitler. It argues that the film exploits our fascination with fascism and its iconography in a thoroughly ambivalent fashion and through the characteristic trademark of hyperbolic violence. Tarantino’s database narrative refers to war films and Westerns (genres that legitimise violence) but its rather more self-reflexive take on fascism must also be seen in the context of cinematic precursors that send up the audience’s habitually disavowed fascination with fascism, farces such as Mel Brooks’ The Producers and Helmut Dietl’s Schtonk!.

Keywords:   Quentin Tarantino, Inglourious Basterds, alternative history, Schtonk, The Producers, film violence, war film, Hitler assassination, database narrative, fascinating Fascism

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