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Healing the NationPrisoners of War, Medicine and Nationalism in Turkey, 1914-1939$
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Yucel Yanikdag

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780748665785

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748665785.001.0001

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Imagining Community and Identity in Russia and Egypt: a Comparison

Imagining Community and Identity in Russia and Egypt: a Comparison

Chapter:
(p.46) Chapter 2 Imagining Community and Identity in Russia and Egypt: a Comparison
Source:
Healing the Nation
Author(s):

Yücel Yanikdağ

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748665785.003.0003

Taking the findings of the previous chapter, this chapter turns to examine the influence of physical, social, and psychological factors on the prisoners’ perception of identity, tradition, culture, and proper behaviour. Focusing on several themes, the chapter argues that in the stressful physical and emotional environment of captivity, minor distinctions among the prisoners assumed profound meaning. The harsher the conditions, the deeper the conflicts became among the prisoners. Yet, the physical environment and precariousness of life in captivity were not the only factors in different levels of conflict among the two locations of captivity. The presence of German and Austro-Hungarian prisoners in Russia added to the stress of captivity for those who feared that national and cultural distinctions were fading away as some Ottomans emulated European manners. Differences forged under harsh conditions in Russia helped define more sharply what represented proper culture, tradition and behaviour.

Keywords:   Arab-Ottomans, Islam, Vetluga, theatre, Krasnoyarsk, alla Franca and alla Turca, national identity, inter-rank relations, ethnic relations, enemy image

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