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Walter Scott and the Limits of Language$

Alison Lumsden

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780748641536

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641536.001.0001

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(p.232) Bibliography

(p.232) Bibliography

Source:
Walter Scott and the Limits of Language
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press

Works by Scott

Scott, Walter, ‘Introduction to Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border’, Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border 2 vols (Kelso: James Ballantyne for T. Cadell and W. Davis, Strand, London, 1802), pp. 1.i–cx.

——, The Lay of the Last Minstrel: A Poem (London and Edinburgh: Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme and A. Constable and Co., 1805).

——, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, Bart. (Edinburgh and London: Robert Cadell, 1833–4), vol. 6.

——, Marmion; A Tale of Flodden Field (Edinburgh and London: Archibald Constable and Company and William Miller and John Murray, 1808).

——, The Lady of the Lake: A Poem in Six Cantos (Edinburgh and London: John Ballantyne and Co. and Longman Hurst, Rees, and Orme, and William Miller, 1810).

——, Waverley (1814), ed. by P. D. Garside, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 1 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007).

——, Guy Mannering (1815), ed. by P. D. Garside, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 2 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1999).

——, The Antiquary (1816), ed. by David Hewitt, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 3 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1995).

——, The Tale of Old Mortality (1816), ed. by Douglas Mack, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, 4b (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1993).

——, The Heart of Mid-Lothian (1818), ed. by David Hewitt and Alison Lumsden, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 6 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004).

——, The Bride of Lammermoor (1819), ed. by J. H. Alexander, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 7a (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1995).

——, Ivanhoe (1820), ed. by Graham Tulloch, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 8 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998).

——, The Pirate, ed. by Mark Weinstein with Alison Lumsden, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 12 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2001).

——, The Fortunes of Nigel (1822), ed. by Frank Jordan, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 13 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2004).

——, Peveril of the Peak (1822), ed. by Alison Lumsden, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 14 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007). (p.233)

——, Redgauntlet (1824), ed. by G. A. M. Wood with David Hewitt, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 17 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1997).

——, Chronicles of the Canongate (1827), ed. by Claire Lamont, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 20 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000).

——, Count Robert of Paris (1831), ed. by J. H. Alexander, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 23a (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006).

——, Castle Dangerous (1831), ed. by J. H. Alexander, Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels 23b (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000).

——, Reliquiae Trotcosienses Or The Gabions of the Late Jonathan Oldbuck Esq. of Monkbarns, ed. by Gerard Carruthers and Alison Lumsden (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press in association with The Abbotsford Library Project Trust, 2004).

——, Abbotsford Edition of the Waverley Novels (Edinburgh and London: Robert Cadell and Houlston & Stoneman, 1842–7).

——, General Preface’, Waverley Novels, 48 vols (Edinburgh: Constable and Co. 1829–33).

——, ‘Henry Fielding’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh: Robert Cadell, 1834–6), pp. 3.77–116.

——, ‘Samuel Richardson’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh: Robert Cadell, 1834–6), pp. 3.3–76.

——, ‘Robert Bage’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh: Robert Cadell, 1834–6), pp. 3.441–464.

——, ‘Tobias Smollett’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh: Robert Cadell, 1834–6), pp. 3.117–190.

——, Daniel De Foe’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh: Robert Cadell, 1834–6), pp. 4.228–281.

——, ‘Tales of My Landlord’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh: Robert Cadell, 1834–6), pp. 19.1–86.

——, ‘Kirkton’s Church History’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh, 1834–6), pp. 19.213–282.

——, ‘Essay on Romance’, The Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, 28 vols (Edinburgh, 1834–6), 6.1–216.

——, ‘Emma: a Novel’, Quarterly Review, xiv (1815–16); reprinted in Sir Walter Scott on Novelists and Fiction, ed. by Ioan Williams (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1968), pp. 225–36.

——, ‘Introductory Remarks on Popular Poetry’, The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., ed. by J. G. Lockhart, 12 vols (Edinburgh and London: Robert Cadell, 1833–4), pp. 1.5–91.

——, ‘Essay on Imitations of the Ancient Ballad’, Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., ed. by J. G. Lockhart, 12 vols (Edinburgh and London: Robert Cadell, 1833–4), pp. 4.3–78.

——, ‘Introduction to The Lay of the Last Minstrel’, Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., ed. by J. G. Lockhart, 12 vols (Edinburgh and London: Robert Cadell, 1833–4), pp. 6.5–31. (p.234)

——, The Journal of Sir Walter Scott, ed. by W. E. K. Anderson (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972).

——, The Letters of Sir Walter Scott, ed. by H. J. C. Grierson, 12 vols (London: Constable, 1932–7).

Manuscript Sources

NLS MS. 1548: The Heart of Mid-Lothian.

NLS MS 323 f. 204r; f. 222r–v: Note by Robert Cadell stating works contracted for with the Author of Waverley.

NLS MS 791, f. 311v: Constable to James Ballantyne, 22 July 1822.

NLS MS 21059, f. 133r: Scott to James Ballantyne, October 1822.

NLS MS 21059, f. 141r: Scott to James Ballantyne, 5 November 1822.

NLS MS 21021, f. 1r.: Robert Cadell’s diary for 1831.

NLS, MS 745, f. 211 Contract for Reliquiae Trotcosienses [6 September 1830].

NLS MS 1752, f. 387: Letter to Robert Cadell, 12 July 1831.

Secondary Materials

Alexander, J. H. and David Hewitt ‘Preface’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. vii–viii.

Alexander, J. H., ‘The Lay of the Last Minstrel’: Three Essays (Salzburg: Institut für Englische Sprache und Literatur Universität Salzburg, 1978).

——, The Reception of Scott’s Poetry by His Correspondents: 1796–1817, 2 vols (Salzburg: Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik Universität Salzburg, 1979).

——, ‘Marmion’: Studies in Interpretation and Composition (Salzburg: Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik Universität Salzburg, 1981).

——, Two Studies in Romantic Reviewing: Edinburgh Reviewers and the English Tradition: The Reviewing of Walter Scott’s Poetry 1805–1817 (Salzburg: Institut für Englische Sprache und Literatur Universität Salzburg, 1976).

Altieri, Charles, ‘Wittgenstein on Consciousness and Language: A Challenge to Derridean Literary Theory’, Modern Language Notes 91 (1976), pp. 1397–423.

Anderson, Carol, ‘The Power of Naming: Language, Identity and Betrayal in The Heart of Midlothian’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 189–201.

Anderson, James, Sir Walter Scott and History with other papers (Edinburgh: The Edina Press, 1981).

Bal, Mieke, ‘Over-writing as Un-writing: Descriptions, World-Making and Novelistic Time’ in Franco Moretti, ed., The Novel, 2 vols (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006), pp. 2.571–610.

Barth, John, The Friday Book: Essays and Other Nonfiction (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1984). (p.235)

Barthes, Roland, Writing Degree Zero, translated from the French by Annette Lavers and Colin Smith (London: Jonathan Cape, 1967).

Beiderwell, Bruce, ed., Romantic Enlightenment: Sir Walter Scott and the Politics of History. Spec. issue of European Romantic Review 13.3 (2002), pp. 223–324.

Blair, Hugh, Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, new edition, 3 vols (Edinburgh: Bell and Bradfute, 1811).

Bloom, Harold, The Ringers in the Tower: Studies in Romantic Tradition (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1971).

Brenkman, John, ‘Innovation: Notes on Nihilism and the Aesthetics of the Novel’ in Franco Moretti, ed., The Novel, 2 vols (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006), pp. 2. 808–38.

Brink, André, The Novel: Language and Narrative from Cervantes to Calvino (Basingstoke: Macmillan Press, 1998).

Broadie, Alexander, ‘Introduction: What was the Scottish Enlightenment?’ in The Scottish Enlightenment: An Anthology, ed. by Alexander Broadie (Edinburgh: Canongate Classics, 1997), pp. 3–31.

Brown, Iain Gordon, ‘Scott, Literature and Abbotsford’ in Iain Gordon Brown, ed., Abbotsford and Sir Walter Scott: The Image and the Influence (Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries for Scotland, 2003), pp. 4–36.

Brown, Marshall, ‘Poetry and the novel’ in Richard Maxwell and Katie Trumpener eds, The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 107–28.

Buckingham, George, Duke of, The Rehearsal in The Rehearsal and The Critic, with a preface by Cedric Gale (New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 1960).

Burke, John J., ‘The Romantic Window and the Postmodern Mirror: The Medieval Worlds of Sir Walter Scott and Umberto Eco’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 556–68.

Burnet, James, Lord Monboddo, Of the Origin and Progress of Language, 2nd edition, 6 vols (Edinburgh: J. Balfour and T. Cadell, 1774–1809).

Buzard, James, ‘Translation and Tourism: Scott’s Waverley and the Rendering of Culture’, Yale Journal of Criticism 8 (1995), pp. 31–59.

Campbell, George, ‘The Philosophy of Rhetoric’ in The Scottish Enlightenment: An Anthology, ed. by Alexander Broadie (Edinburgh: Canongate Classics, 1997), pp. 685–96.

Chandler, James, England in 1819: The Politics of Literary Culture and the Case of Romantic Historicism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998).

Cheape, Hugh, Tevor Cowie and Colin Wallace, ‘Sir Walter Scott, the Abbotsford Collection and The National Museums of Scotland’ in Iain Gordon Brown, ed., Abbotsford and Sir Walter Scott: The Image and the Influence (Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries for Scotland, 2003), pp. 49–89.

Clark, Arthur Melville, Sir Walter Scott: The Formative Years (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood, 1969). (p.236)

Cochrane, J. G. Catalogue of the Library at Abbotsford (Edinburgh: Bannatyne Club, 1838).

Cockshut, A. O. J., The Achievement of Walter Scott (London: Collins, 1969).

Cole, Lucinda and Richard G. Swartz, ‘“Why Should I Wish for Words?”: Literacy, Articulation and the Borders of Literary Culture’ in Mary A. Favret and Nicola J. Watson, eds, At the Limits of Romanticism: Essays in Cultural, Feminist, and Materialist Criticism (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1994), pp. 143–69.

Colley, Linda, Britons: Forging the Nation, 1707–1837 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992).

Cooney, Seamus, ‘Scott’s Anonymity – Its Motives and Consequences’, Studies in Scottish Literature 10 (1973), pp. 207–19.

——, ‘Scott and Progress: The Tragedy of “The Highland Widow”’, Studies in Short Fiction 11:1 (Winter, 1974), pp. 11–16.

——, ‘Scott and Cultural Relativism: “The Two Drovers”’, Studies in Short Fiction 15:1 (Winter, 1978), pp. 1–9.

Craig, Cairns, ‘Coleridge, Hume, and the chains of the Romantic imagination’ in Leith Davis, Ian Duncan and Janet Sorensen, eds, Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 20–37.

——, Out of History: Narrative Paradigms in Scottish and English Culture (Edinburgh: Polygon, 1996).

——, Associationism and the Literary Imagination: From the Phantasmal Chaos (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007).

Currie, Mark, ed., Metafiction (London and New York: Longman, 1995).

Dale, Gillian M., ‘Jeanie Deans, The “Heart” of Midlothian, and Feminist Ethical Theory’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 202–15.

D’Arcy, Julian Meldon, Subversive Scott: The Waverley Novels and Scottish Nationalism (Reykjavik: University of Iceland Press, 2005).

Derrida, Jacques, Writing and Difference, translated by Alan Bass (London, 1978).

——, Dissemination, translated by Barbara Johnson (London: Athlone, 1981).

Duncan, Ian, Modern Romance and Transformations of the Novel: The Gothic, Scott, Dickens (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992).

——, Ann Rowland and Charles Snodgrass, eds, Scott, Scotland and Romantic Nationalism, Special ed. Studies in Romanticism 40:1 (Spring, 2001).

——, Scott’s Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007).

——, ‘Hume and the Scottish Enlightenment’ in Ian Brown, Thomas Owen Clancy, Susan Manning and Murray Pittock, eds, The Edinburgh History of Scottish Literature, 3 vols (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007), 2.71–79.

——, ‘Scotland and the novel’ in Richard Maxwell and Katie Trumpener, eds, The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 251–64. (p.237)

——, ‘Scott, the History of the Novel, and the History of Fiction’ in Evan Gottlieb and Ian Duncan, eds, Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2009), pp. 88–96.

Favret, Mary A. and Nicola J. Watson, eds, At the Limits of Romanticism: Essays in Cultural, Feminist, and Materialist Criticism (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1994).

Ferris, Ina, ‘The Reader in the Rhetoric of Realism: Scott, Thackeray and Eliot’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott and his Influence: The Papers of the Aberdeen Scott Conference, 1982 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1983), pp. 382–92.

——, The Achievement of Literary Authority: Gender, History, and the Waverley Novels (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1991).

——, ‘The Indefatigable Word: Scott and the Comedy of Surplusage’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 19–26.

——, ‘Translation from the Borders: Encounter and Recalcitrance in Waverley and Clan-Albin’, Eighteenth-Century Fiction 9.2 (1997), pp. 203–22.

Fielding, Henry, The History of Tom Jones, ed. by R. P. C. Mutter (London: Penguin, 1985).

Fielding, Penny, Writing and Orality: Nationality, Culture, and Nineteenth-Century Scottish Fiction (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996).

Findlay, L. M., ‘“Perilous Linguists”: Scots, wha hae their Foucault Read’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 27–39.

Forbes, Duncan, ‘The Rationalism of Sir Walter Scott’, Cambridge Journal 7 (1953), pp. 20–35.

Freeman, Michael and Andrew D. E. Lewis, eds, Law and Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999).

Gallagher, Catherine, ‘The Rise of Fictionality’ in Franco Moretti, ed., The Novel 2 vols (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006), pp. 1.336–63.

Gamerschlag, Kurt, ‘The Making and Un-Making of Sir Walter Scott’s Count Robert of Paris’, Studies in Scottish Literature 15 (1980), pp. 95–123.

Garside, Peter, ‘Scott and the “Philosophical” Historians’, Journal of the History of Ideas 36 (1975), pp. 497–512.

Gaston, Patricia S., Prefacing the Waverley Novels: A Reading of Sir Walter Scott’s Prefaces to the Waverley Novels (New York: Peter Lang, 1991).

Gifford, Douglas, ‘Scott’s Fiction and the Search for Mythic Regeneration’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott and his Influence: The Papers of the Aberdeen Scott Conference, 1982 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1983), pp. 180–8.

——, Sarah Dunnigan and Alan MacGillivray (eds), Scottish Literature in English and Scots (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2002). (p.238)

Goody, Jack, ‘From Oral to Written: An Anthropological Breakthrough in Storytelling’ in Franco Moretti, ed., The Novel, 2 vols (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006), pp. 1.3–36.

Gordon, Jan B., ‘“Liquidating the Sublime”: Gossip in Scott’s Novels’ in Mary A. Favret and Nicola J. Watson, eds, At the Limits of Romanticism: Essays in Cultural, Feminist, and Materialist Criticism (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994), pp. 246–68.

Goslee, Nancy Moore, Scott the Rhymer (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1988).

——, ‘“Some Hidden Movement”: Signs of Embarrassment in Scott’s Poetic Language’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 72–88.

Gottlieb, Evan, Feeling British: Sympathy and National Identity in Scottish and English Writing, 1707–1832 (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2007).

Gottlieb, Evan and Ian Duncan, eds, Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2009).

Groom, Nick, ‘Romantic poetry and antiquity’ in James Chandler and Maureen N. McLane, eds, The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 35–52.

Hale, Dorothy J., ed., The Novel: an Anthology of Criticism and Theory 1900–2000 (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2006).

——, ‘Introduction’ to ‘Part III: Structuralism, Narratology, Deconstruction’ in Dorothy J. Hale, ed., The Novel: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2006), pp. 186–204.

Hamilton, Paul, Metaromanticism: Aesthetics, Literature, Theory (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993).

Harvie, Christopher, ‘Scott and the Image of Scotland’ in Alan Bold, ed., Sir Walter Scott: The Long-Forgotten Melody (London: Vision and Barnes & Noble, 1983), pp. 17–42.

Hayden, John O., ed., Scott: The Critical Heritage (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1970).

Hewitt, David, ‘Walter Scott’ in The History of Scottish Literature, 4 vols (Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, 1988), pp. 3.65–85.

——, ‘The Phonocentric Scott’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 581–92.

——, ‘Introduction’ in Walter Scott, Redgauntlet, ed. by G. A. M. Wood with David Hewitt (London: Penguin, 1997), pp. xiii–xxxi.

——, ‘Introduction’ in Reliquiae Trotcosienses Or The Gabions of the Late Jonathan Oldbuck Esq. of Monkbarns, ed. by Gerard Carruthers and Alison Lumsden (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press in association with The Abbotsford Library Project Trust, 2004), pp. xi–xxii. (p.239)

——, ‘Teaching The Heart of Mid-Lothian’ in Evan Gottlieb and Ian Duncan, eds, Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2009), pp. 150–6.

Hobsbaum, Philip, ‘Scott’s “Apoplectic” Novels’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott and his Influence: The Papers of the Aberdeen Scott Conference, 1982 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1983), pp. 149–56.

Home, Henry, Lord Kames, Elements of Criticism, 4th edition, 2 vols (Edinburgh: A. Kincaid and J. Bell, 1769).

——, Sketches of the History of Man, 3rd edition, 2 vols (Dublin: James Williams, 1779).

Hume, David, Selected Essays, ed. by Stephen Copley and Andrew Edgar (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993).

Inglis, Tony, ‘Introduction’ in Walter Scott, The Heart of Mid-Lothian, ed. by Tony Inglis (London: Penguin, 1994), pp. ix–l.

Irvine, Robert P., Enlightenment and Romance: Gender and Agency in Smollett and Scott (Oxford and New York: Peter Lang, 2000).

Jameson, Frederic, The Prison-house of Language: A Critical Account of Structuralism and Russian Formalism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1972).

Jefferson, D. W., Walter Scott: An Introductory Essay (Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2002).

Jones, Catherine, Literary Memory: Scott’s Waverley Novels and the Psychology of Narrative (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2003).

Jordan, Frank, ‘Chrystal Croftangry, Scott’s Last and Best Mask’, Scottish Literary Journal 7:1 (1980), pp. 185–92.

——, ‘Scott, Chatterton, Byron and the Wearing of Masks’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott and his Influence: The Papers of the Aberdeen Scott Conference, 1982 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1983), pp. 279–89.

Kerr, James, Fiction against History: Scott as Storyteller (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).

Kirkton, James The Secret and True History of the Church of Scotland, from the Restoration to 1678, ed. by C. K. Sharpe (London and Edinburgh: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, London; and John Ballantyne, Edinburgh, 1817).

Lamont, Claire, ‘Introduction’ in Walter Scott, Waverley, ed. by Claire Lamont (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986), pp. vii–xx.

——, ‘Walter Scott: Anonymity and the Unmasking of Harlequin’ in E. J. Clery, Caroline Franklin and Peter Garside, eds, Authorship, Commerce and the Public: Scenes of Writing, 1750–1850 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002), pp. 54–66.

——, ‘Introduction’ in Walter Scott, Chronicles of the Canongate (London: Penguin, 2003), pp. xi–xxix. (p.240)

Land, Stephen K., From Signs to Propositions: The Concept of Form in Eighteenth-Century Semantic Theory (London: Longman, 1974).

Langan, Celeste, ‘Understanding Media in 1805: Audiovisual Hallucination in The Lay of the Last Minstrel’ in Ian Duncan, Ann Rowland and Charles Snodgrass, eds, Scott, Scotland and Romantic Nationalism, Special ed. Studies in Romanticism 40:1 (Spring, 2001), pp. 49–70.

——, and Maureen N. McLane, ‘The medium of Romantic poetry’ in James Chandler and Maureen N. McLane, eds, The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 239–62.

——, ‘“The Poetry of Pure Memory”: Teaching Scott’s Novels in the Context of Romanticism’ in Evan Gottlieb and Ian Duncan, eds, Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2009), pp. 67–76.

Leavis, F. R., The Great Tradition: George Eliot, Henry James, Joseph Conrad (London: Chatto and Windus, 1962; 1948).

Leith, Davis, Acts of Union: Scotland and the Literary Negotiation of the British Nation, 1707–1830 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998).

Levine, George, The Realist Imagination: English Fiction from Frankenstein to Lady Chatterley (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1981).

Lima, Luiz Costa, ‘The Control of the Imagination and the Novel’ in Franco Moretti, ed., The Novel, 2 vols (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006), pp. 1.37–68.

Lincoln, Andrew, Walter Scott and Modernity (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007).

Lockhart, J. G., Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., 7 vols (Edinburgh: Robert Cadell, 1837–8).

Lodge, David, The Art of Fiction Illustrated from Classic and Modern Texts (London: Penguin, 1992).

Lukács, Georg, The Historical Novel, translated by Hannah and Stanley Mitchell (Lincoln, NE and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1983).

Lumsden, Alison, ‘Burns, Scott and Intertextuality’ in Gerard Carruthers, ed., The Edinburgh Companion to Robert Burns (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009), pp. 125–36.

——, ‘Scott, Stevenson and Scottish History’ in Penny Fielding, ed., The Edinburgh Companion to Robert Louis Stevenson (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010), pp. 70–85.

Lyotard, Jean-François, The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge, translated from the French by Geoff Bennington and Brian Massumi (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1984).

McCracken-Flesher, Caroline, ‘A Wo/man for a’ that? Subverted Sex and Perverted Politics in The Heart of Midlothian’ in J. H. Alexander and David Hewitt, eds, Scott in Carnival: Selected Papers from the Fourth International Scott Conference, 1991 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 1993), pp. 232–44. (p.241)

——, ‘Pro Matria Mori: Gendered Nationalism and Cultural Death in Scott’s “The Highland Widow”’, Scottish Literary Journal 21.2 (1994), pp. 69–78.

——, ‘Narrating the (gendered) Nation in Walter Scott’s The Heart of Midlothian’, Nineteenth-Century Contexts 24.3 (2002), pp. 291–316.

——, Possible Scotlands: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005).

McGann, Jerome, ‘Walter Scott’s Romantic Postmodernity’ in Leith Davis, Ian Duncan and Janet Sorensen, eds, Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), pp. 113–29.

McIntosh, Ainsley, ‘Marmion; A Tale of Flodden Field. A Critical Edition’ (Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Aberdeen, 2009).

McKeon, Michael, ed., Theory of the Novel: A Historical Approach (Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000).

McLane, Maureen N., Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).

McMaster, Graham, Scott and Society (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981).

McNeil, Kenneth, ‘The Limits of Diversity: Using Scott’s “The Two Drovers” to Teach Multiculturalism in a Survey or Nonmajors Course’ in Evan Gottlieb and Ian Duncan, eds, Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2009), pp. 123–9.

Manning, Susan, Fragments of Union: Making Connections in Scottish and American Writing (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002).

Maxwell, Richard, ‘The historiography of fiction in the Romantic period’ in Richard Maxwell and Katie Trumpener, eds, The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 7–21.

——, ‘The historical novel’ in Richard Maxwell and Katie Trumpener, eds, The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), pp. 65–87.

Merikoski, Ingrid A., ed., Well Temper’d Eloquence (Edinburgh: David Hume Institute, 1996).

Miller, J. Hillis, ‘Reading Narrative’ in Dorothy J. Hale, ed., The Novel: An Anthology of Criticism and Theory (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2006), pp. 242–56.

Millgate, Jane, Walter Scott: The Making of the Novelist (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1984).

——, Scott’s Last Edition: A Study in Publishing History (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1987).

——, ‘“Naught of the Bridal”: Narrative Resistance in The Lay of the Last Minstrel’, Scottish Literary Journal, 17.2 (November, 1990), pp. 16–26.

Moretti, Franco, Atlas of the European Novel, 1800–1900 (New York: Verso, 1998).

——, ed., The Novel, 2 vols (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006.

——, ‘Serious Century’ in Franco Moretti, ed., The Novel, 2 vols (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2006) pp. 2.364–400. (p.242)

North, Roger, Examen: Or, An Enquiry into the Credit and Veracity of a Pretended Complete History (London, 1740).

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