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The Paul De Man Notebooks$
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Paul de Man and Martin McQuillan

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748641048

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641048.001.0001

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From Nietzsche to Rousseau

From Nietzsche to Rousseau

Chapter:
(p.300) 33 From Nietzsche to Rousseau
Source:
The Paul De Man Notebooks
Author(s):

Martin McQuillan

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748641048.003.0034

In this article, Paul de Man describes his plan to complete a study of European romanticism and post-romanticism in two parts, to be entitled From Rousseau to Nietzsche. The project is the outcome of a fifteen-year-long concern with the history and the poetics of romantic and post-romantic literature in France, Germany, and England. It began as a study of the poetry of Stéphane Mallarmé, William Butler Yeats, and Stefan George written as a doctoral dissertation at Harvard University under the title ‘The Post-Romantic Predicament’. The first part of the book consists primarily of a reinterpretation of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and of the Rousseauistic heritage in France, Germany, and England, based on the particular configuration of the categories of self, language, and time that appear in this writer. The second part extends the problem to the historical question of the romantic heritage in the nineteenth and twentieth century. The book concludes with a chapter on Rousseau's and Friedrich Nietzsche's conception of literary language.

Keywords:   romanticism, Paul de Man, From Rousseau to Nietzsche, romantic literature, France, Germany, England, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Friedrich Nietzsche, literary language

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