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Literature of the 1900sThe Great Edwardian Emporium$
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Jonathan Wild

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780748635061

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748635061.001.0001

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Afterword

Afterword

Chapter:
(p.185) Afterword
Source:
Literature of the 1900s
Author(s):

Jonathan Wild

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748635061.003.0007

This concluding chapter first turns to Virginia Woolf's famous remark that ‘on or about December 1910 human character changed’. It examines the problems inherent in taking too seriously Virginia Woolf's tongue-in-cheek claim for December 1910 as a starting point for artistic development in Britain in the twentieth century. The lasting influence of these inflexible interpretations of Woolf's thesis has hampered our understanding of what lies on the other side of this putative watershed. The chapter then re-examines the designation of this period's literature as ‘Edwardian’, and lays out the potentially problematic and misleading nature of this label before conceding that, despite the label's shortcomings, the term ‘Edwardian’ still has its uses.

Keywords:   Virginia Woolf, artistic development, twentieth century, Edwardian literature, interconnectedness, artistic legacy

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