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Christmas, Ideology and Popular Culture$
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Sheila Whiteley

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780748628087

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748628087.001.0001

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Reflections of a Jewish Childhood during Christmas

Reflections of a Jewish Childhood during Christmas

Chapter:
(p.188) Chapter 12 Reflections of a Jewish Childhood during Christmas
Source:
Christmas, Ideology and Popular Culture
Author(s):

Gerry Bloustien

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748628087.003.0013

This chapter illustrates how the pressures to conform create their own specific pressures. On reflection, it wonders whether the author has laid too heavy a responsibility on the celebration of Christmas, whether she has lost her own pleasure and enjoyment of Christmas completely. As a child of migrant parents growing up in post-war Britain, she lived between two cultures. Christmas seemed magical and seductive, particularly to a child in between cultures, as it were. In many British Jewish homes in the post-war period of growing affluence, under constant pressure from their young children and television advertising, Hanukkah gifts became larger and more in line with what their non-Jewish school-friends were receiving.

Keywords:   post-war Britain, Christmas, Jewish childhood, British Jewish homes, Britain, Hanukkah gifts

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