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Newfoundland and Labrador English$
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Sandra Clarke

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780748626168

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626168.001.0001

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Survey of previous work

Survey of previous work

Chapter:
(p.157) 6 Survey of previous work
Source:
Newfoundland and Labrador English
Author(s):

Sandra Clarke

Andrew Erskine

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626168.003.0006

This chapter provides a summary of the literature relating to Newfoundland English, from the late 16th century to the present. It outlines the contributions to the description of local features, especially vocabulary, provided by the writings of lay visitors to the region (explorers, colonizers, military personnel, scientists, clergy) from the period of initial European discovery to the early 20th century. It also documents literary representations of local dialect, which have existed since the mid 19th century. The chapter’s primary focus, however, is the rich linguistically-informed literature spanning c. 1950 to the present. This encompasses a broad range, and includes investigations of vocabulary, place names and family names; regional dialectology; social dialectology and quantitative variationist studies; community dialect studies; and (socio-) historical investigations comparing local feature use to that of source varieties in Britain and Ireland. The chapter also points to areas requiring further research, and provides a listing of web resources on local language.

Keywords:   literature survey, literary representations of dialect, Newfoundland English web resources

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