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Walter Scott and Modernity$
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Andrew Lincoln

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780748626069

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626069.001.0001

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Postscript

Postscript

Chapter:
(p.218) Chapter 8 Postscript
Source:
Walter Scott and Modernity
Author(s):

Andrew Lincoln

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626069.003.0008

This chapter reviews some aspects of Scott's fiction, specifically its historical perspective and accuracy, and discusses the concept of the romance of disinterested virtue, as well as Scott's representations of the triumph of virtue. It then identifies certain developments in nineteenth-century culture that affected Scott's romance fiction, and ends by determining that Scott's contradictory historical romance should be more of a complicated response to uncertain times instead of a retreat into nostalgia.

Keywords:   historical perspective, historical accuracy, disinterested virtue, triumph of virtue, nineteenth-century culture, romance fiction, historical romance

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