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Walter Scott and Modernity$
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Andrew Lincoln

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780748626069

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626069.001.0001

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Liberal Dilemmas: Scott and Covenanting Tradition

Liberal Dilemmas: Scott and Covenanting Tradition

The Tale of Old Mortality and The Heart of Mid-Lothian

Chapter:
(p.151) Chapter 6 Liberal Dilemmas: Scott and Covenanting Tradition
Source:
Walter Scott and Modernity
Author(s):

Andrew Lincoln

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626069.003.0006

This chapter explains how the historical perspective of Scott's fiction permits the liberal conscience to be confronted with identities, beliefs and the kinds of allegiance that it has supposedly renounced. It argues that this confrontation allows an unprecedented fictional engagement with several enduring social, moral and political problems presented by the arrival of liberalism. The chapter also identifies two kinds of criticism, and studies two novels on the complicated treatment of Covenanting history and the conciliatory approach to history.

Keywords:   historical perspective, liberal conscience, fictional engagement, liberalism, kinds of criticism, Covenanting history, conciliatory approach

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