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Film SequelsTheory and Practice from Hollywood to Bollywood$
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Carolyn Jess-Cooke

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748626038

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626038.001.0001

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Sequelisation and Secondary Memory: Steven Spielberg's Artificial Intelligence: A. I. (2001)

Sequelisation and Secondary Memory: Steven Spielberg's Artificial Intelligence: A. I. (2001)

Chapter:
(p.130) Chapter 6 Sequelisation and Secondary Memory: Steven Spielberg's Artificial Intelligence: A. I. (2001)
Source:
Film Sequels
Author(s):

Carolyn Jess-Cooke

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748626038.003.0007

This chapter compares the sequel's memory-making registers with what Dominick LaCapra has called ‘secondary memory’. Steven Spielberg's Artificial Intelligence: A. I. is explored to address the sequel's more complex registers of memory, repetition, erasure and history in three major contexts: cultural memory, the psychological development of memory and virtual memory. It persistently raises a number of psychoanalytic discourses and responses. Sequelisation in A. I. is a dominating feature of post-global warming, post-apocalyptic America. It then considers A. I. as a means by which a fuller understanding of both sequelisation and the Real can be obtained. The notion of the sequel organises the film's presentation of historical repetition. The repetition of the Real appears in David's case to create every experience and urge as a repetition of the ‘thing itself’, which is essentially himself. The sequel appears to problematise the experience, or memory, of the original.

Keywords:   sequel, Dominick LaCapra, secondary memory, Steven Spielberg, Artificial Intelligence, sequelisation, Real, David

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