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Media AudiencesTelevision, Meaning and Emotion$

Kristyn Gorton

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780748624171

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748624171.001.0001

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(p.156) Bibliography

(p.156) Bibliography

Source:
Media Audiences
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press

Bibliography references:

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Interviews

13/6/5 – interview with British television writer/producer, Kay Mellor

13/2/8 – interview with a group of post-graduate students at the University of York on the concept of emotion in television (Participants included: Noelani Peace, Martin Zeller, Claire Swarbrick, Junna Wang and Hsaio-Chen Chang)

9/3/8 – interview with Brigie de Courcy and Kevin McGee, Fair City, Dublin

23/5/8 – interview with Anita Turner, Emmerdale

26/5/8 – interview with Belinda Johns, Rollern Productions

3/6/8 – interview with Lisa Holdsworth, Leeds

8/9/8 – interview with Steve Frost, ITV Drama

Television and Film, Referencess

24 (Fox 2001–)

Alien Nation (Fox 1989–90)

Analyze This (Warner Bros 1999)

American Idol (Fremantle Media 2002–)

The Avengers (ITV 1961–9)

Band of Gold (Granada 1996)

Batman (20th Century Fox 1966–8)

Battlestar Galactica (Glen A. Larson 1978–9) and Battlestar Galactica Reimagined (BSkyB 2004–)

Between the Sheets (ITV Kay Mellor, 2003)

Big Brother (Endemol 1999–)

The Biggest Loser (NBC 2004–)

Blake's 7 (BBC, Terry Nation, 1978–81)

Boys Don't Cry (Kimberly Pierse 1999)

Boys from the Blackstuff (BBC 1982)

Brothers & Sisters (ABC 2006–)

Cathy Come Home (BBC, Ken Loach, 1966)

Children's Ward (ITV 1998–2000)

Clocking Off (Paul Abbott, BBC 2000–3)

Cold Feet (Granada, Mike Bullen, 1997–2003)

(p.172) Dallas (Lorimar 1978–91)

Doctor Who (BBC 1963–)

Dr Phil (Harpo Productions 2002–)

The Elephant Man (Lynch 1980)

ER (Michael Crichton, 1994–)

Extreme Makeover (ABC 2002–7)

Family Guy (Seth MacFarlane 1999–)

Fanny and Elvis (Kay Mellor, The Film Consortium, 1999)

Fans and Freaks: The Culture of Comics and Conventions (Lackey 2002)

Fat Friends (ITV, Rollern & Tiger Aspect, 1999–)

Galaxy Quest (Parisot 1990)

Grey's Anatomy (ABC 2005–)

Heroes (NBC 2006–)

Lost (ABC 2004–)

Misery (Reiner 1990)

My Life with Count Dracula (Black 2003)

One Summer (YTV 1983)

Oprah Winfrey Show (Harpo Productions 1986–)

Perfect Strangers (Stephen Poliakoff 2001)

Playing the Field (Tiger Aspect for BBC 1995)

Quantum Leap (NBC 1989–93)

Red Dwarf (BBC 1988–99)

Red Dwarf (BBC 1988–99)

Sex and the City (HBO, Darren Star, 1998–2004)

Shameless (Channel 4, Paul Abbott, 2004–)

Six Feet Under (HBO, Alan Ball, 2001–5)

The Sopranos (HBO, David Chase, 1999–2007)

Spaced (Paramount 1999–2001)

Star Wars (George Lucas 1977)

State of Play (Paul Abbott, BBC, 2003)

Strictly Come Dancing (BBC1 2004–)

Survivor (CBS 2000–; ITV 2001–)

The Swan (Fox 2004–5)

Ten Years Younger (Channel 4 2004–)

Top Gear (BBC 1978–)

Top Gun (Tony Scott 1986)

Toy Story 2 (John Lasseter 1999)

Trekkies (Nygard 1997)

Twin Peaks (ABC, Frost/Lynch, 1990–1)

Ugly Betty (ABC 2006–)

What Not to Wear (BBC2 2001–4; BBC1 2004–)

Wife Swap (RDF Media, Channel 4, 2003–)

The Wire (HBO, David Simon, 2002–8)

X-Factor (UK) (ITV 2006–)