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Deleuze and the Social$
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Martin Fuglsang and Bent Meier Sorensen

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780748620920

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748620920.001.0001

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I Knew there were Kisses in the Air

I Knew there were Kisses in the Air

Chapter:
(p.96) Chapter 5 I Knew there were Kisses in the Air
Source:
Deleuze and the Social
Author(s):

Thomas Bay

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748620920.003.0005

This chapter addresses the problem concerning Gilles Deleuze's assertion that the link between man and the world is broken and that we need reasons to believe in this world. It argues that if we consider the functioning of an economy or that capacity for subordinating the vitalities of life to its own workings, then we need we think of economy beyond the universal law of exchange. It attempts to affirm the practice of begging as the non-thought within economic thought itself, the outside that always remains to be thought, that which the economy is unable to think.

Keywords:   Gilles Deleuze, world, man, economy, vitalities of life, universal law, begging, economic thought

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